PicoTechnology for Biorationals and BioPesticides Pest Controls.
805 Cottage Hill Way, Brandon, Fl 33511
USA 800-995-9203, Intl 336-306-0193
Email or Call: donwilshe@biobased.us


Science suggests that "PicoAg 4N1 25B" can be mechanical in primary sequential steps!


Bacteria's

Fungi's

Virus's

Insects's

Nursery Tours's


Picotechnology-Industries

Pico-Medicine

Picocides

Pico-Technology

Picosoap



In 2016 we had 2 agriculture journals papers published,and working on 2 more now!

Ramesh Ravella Sweet Sorghum 1312015AJEA23608 Biofuel Feedstock Cut fertilizer by 50% and increased crop production!
Ramesh Ravella Canola Bio-Material Analyses of Two Canola Cultivars Cut fertilizer by 50% increased crop production!

Lets Revisit "Biorationals" and "Biopesticides", No Side Effects, Biologicals, Organic Chemistry, Graphene or Nanotechnology, It's Pico Time!
This was our first and last attempt in 2008 at these Biopesticides pests and we should of increased the rate to 5oz/10gallon acre application program,

but did very well!

We dont see these buys as Pico competition, The biologicals buying spree by agchem companies large and small swept the industry almost as fast as the spread of weed resistance.
Bayer’s trendsetting purchase of AgraQuest for nearly $500 million to BASF’s $1.02 billion acquisition of Becker Underwood to Monsanto’s $300 million investment in Novozymes

Dr. David G. Riley
Coastal Plain Exp. Stn.
Dept. Ent., P.O. Box 748
Tifton, GA 31793
Glover
Squash: Cucurbita pepo var. “Yellow Crookneck”
Pickleworm; Diaphania nitidalis (Stoll)
Cucumber beetles; Diabroticaspp.
Squash bugs; Anasa spp.
Melon aphid; Aphis gossypii
Stink Bugs
Sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius)

EVALUATION OF BIO-RATIONAL INSECTICIDE TREATMENTS IN SQUASH, 2008: vs PICOTECHNOLOGY!

Yellow crook neck squash was direct seeded into 2 rows per 6-ft bare ground beds on June 16 and maintained with standard cultural practices at the Lang Farm, Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station at Tifton. A total of 500 lbs/a of 10-10-10 was applied at planting to Tift pebbly clay loam field plots followed by two side-dress applications of 115 lbs/a 34-0-0. Irrigation was applied weekly with an overhead sprinkler system. Six foliar applications of insecticide were made on June 24, 30, July 2, 8, 17, and 22. Scouting was initiated on July 2 and continued weekly through harvest. One sample of 6 plants, with one leaf per plant for whitefly and aphid counts, was scouted per plot after weekly applications. Squash was harvested from 40 ft of row on July 21 and 30 and fruit were categorized as marketable, pickleworm damage, or virus damaged and the average weight was measured. Data was analyzed using GLM and LSD tests for separation of means (SAS Institute 1990).


The best treatments in terms of melon aphid control early in the test were the Tyratech A, QRD 416 2qt rate, and “SoySoap treatments” By the July 11, the NNI-0101 treatment had a delayed, but very strong effect on suppressing aphids while the other treatments were overwhelmed by a large aphid migration. Unfortunately, none of the treatments provided a strong reduction in the number of mosaic virus-affected squash fruit compared with the untreated check. Also, NNI-0101 tended to increase the incidence of pickleworm which may have offset the benefit of aphid control. Even so, NNI-0101 did provide the highest marketable yield followed by MOI-201 and the 2 qt rate of QRD416 in the first and second harvests. The aphid and pickleworm pressure during this test was very, causing the quality of squash from the check plot plants to be severely affected by the final harvest date (94% unmarketable). Most of the foliar treatments provided some benefit in terms of marketable squash, but under this heavy insect and virus disease pressure, more frequent sprays would have been required to improve yields. Most of the commercial cultivars of squash grown in southern Georgia during the summer include a transgenic resistance to mosaic viruses, but in this evaluation of bio-rational and/or organic treatments we used the standard open pollinated cultivar. In order to evaluate these treatments under a lower pressure scenario, an earlier spring planting would have to be conducted. One useful observation under this heavy insect pressure was that over all, none of the treatments significantly reduced the number of predatory arthropods.


Treatment – product rate per acre

Aphid 7/2/08

Predator1 7/11/08

Aphid 7/11/08

Leaf footed Bug 7/24/08

Stink Bugs 7/24/08

Predator overall

Aphids overall

1. Untreated Check

46 ab

2.3 abc

291 a

0.5 ab

1.3 ab

1.6 a

76 a

2. Novozymes MET @80 oz/a

33 bcd

1.5 abc

284 a

0.0 b

0.5 abc

2.3 a

73 a

3. Tyratech A @ 40 oz/a

28 d

1.3 bc

271 a

0.0 b

0.3 bc

1.8 a

69 a

4. Tyratech B @ 40 oz/a

47 a

1.5 abc

233 a

0.0 b

0.5 abc

1.7 a

63 a

5. AgraQuest, Inc. QRD 416 @ 2 qt/a

30 cd

1.3 bc

256 a

0.0 b

0.0 c

1.3 a

66 a

6. AgraQuest, Inc. QRD 416 @ 1 qt/a

42 abc

2.8 ab

331 a

0.8 a

1.0 abc

1.5 a

86 a

7. AgraQuest, Inc. QRD 416 @ 1 qt/a+ Knack @ 10 zo/a

34 abcd

3.5 a

254 a

0.3 ab

0.3 bc

2.2 a

68 a

Nichino America, Inc. NNI-010120SC
(pyrifluquinazon)@ 1.6 oz/a

40 abcd

0.3 c

74 b

3.3 ab

1.5 a

1.6 a

33 a

9 . SoySoap 0.5% v/v

31 cd

2.3 abc

255 a

0.8 a

0.0 c

2.1 a

70 a

10. Marone MOI-201 @ 0.2% v/v

33 bcd

1.0 bc

299 a

0.3 ab

1.3 ab

2.4 a

75 a



Treatment – product rate per acre

Market wt 7/21/08

Virus fruit 7/30/08

Pickle Worm fruit wt 7/30/08

Total wt overall

Market wt overall

Pickle Worm wt overall

Virus wt overall

1. Untreated Check

0.5 b

7.8 c

1.3 b

9.0 a

0.36 b

3.2 abc

5.3 bc

2. Novozymes MET @80 oz/a

0.7 b

12.0 bc

2.3 ab

11.2 a

1.21 ab

4.6 abc

5.2 bc

3. Tyratech A @40 oz/a

0.7 b

14.3 abc

1.4 b

8.9 a

0.73 ab

2.6 c

5.8 bc

4. Tyratech B @ 40 oz/a

0.5 b

8.0 c

1.9 b

10.6 a

0.43 b

5.3 ab

5.2 bc

5. AgraQuest, Inc. QRD 416

@ 2 qts/a

1.4 ab

11.8 bc

1.8 b

11.1 a

1.34 ab

3.4 abc

6.2 abc

6. AgraQuest, Inc. QRD 416

@ 1 qt/a

0.6 b

10.0 bc

1.3 b

8.4 a

0.45 b

3.0 bc

4.9 c

7. AgraQuest, Inc. QRD 416

@ 1 qt/a+ Knack @ 10 oz/a

1.1 ab

18.0 ab

1.8 b

10.9 a

0.89 ab

2.2 c

7.9 a

Nichino America, Inc.
NNI-010120SC
(pyrifluquinazon)@ 1.6 oz/a

2.2 a

6.8 c

3.5 a

12.1 a

1.75 a

5.6 a

5.2 bc

9. SoySoap 0.5% v/v

1.0 ab

8.8 bc

1.7 b

9.1 a

0.78 ab

4.0 abc

4.2 c

10. Marone MOI-201 @ 0.2% v/v

2.1 a

22.8 a

1.8 b

11.3 a

1.80 a

2.7 c

7.1 ab


We did very good beating companies that sold for hundreds of millions of dollars. Back than were not in the Pest Control Biopesticides business. We plan to enter that business with our PicoAg 25B product in 2019 11 years after the above test.
Starting to look for trails with Universities, Governemnts and JV's with PicoAg 25B product.
This was our first and last attempt in 2008 at these biopseticide pests and we should of increased the rate to 5oz/10gallon acre application program, but did very well!






The Orange are beats 11 years ago with PicoAg 25B


Iowa State Univeristy BioPesticide Trail Soysoap 25B vs Pam Marrone Bio Innovations Regalia

2009 Iowa State University Soysoap vs Marrone Bio Innovations Regalia Organic Soil Fertility and Fungicide on Yield and Pest Management.pdf
2010 Iowa State University Soysoap vs Marrone Bio Innovations Regalia Organic Soil Fertility and Fungicide on Yield and Pest Management.pdf
2011 Iowa State University Soysoap vs Marrone Bio Innovations Regalia Organic Soil Fertility and Fungicide on Yield and Pest Management.pdf



Biopesticides Primed for Growth By: Jackie Pucci | August 12, 2014

“Big things have small beginnings,” is the famous quote from classic flick Lawrence of Arabia. For biopesticides, the maxim holds true: They are confined to the fruit and vegetable fields no longer.

As more major multinationals have jumped into the biopesticides arena, more suppliers, and larger suppliers, mean wider distribution and deeper market penetration of naturally derived products in years to come – especially in coveted row crop areas like the U.S. Midwest and the Brazilian Cerrado.

“That [fruits and vegetables] was a great starting point,” Ziv Tirosh, CEO of Israel-based Stockton Group, maker of Timorex Gold biofungicide, said in an interview with Farm Chemicals International. “But the heart and soul of our food chain is row crops, and it’s a different ball game in terms of economics and application rates. Nevertheless, Stockton and other biopesticide companies are working hard at creating biopesticides that will work economically on row crops.”

For biopesticide companies, multinationals’ growing appetite for their products means immediate global market access and far greater resources to support product R&D, registration, manufacturing and marketing, among other prime opportunities. Easier regulatory also makes them attractive, with the typical timeframe being three to four years versus nine to 10 years, and not even 1/10 of the $250 million cost to register a traditional crop chemical.

“The interest of global crop protection companies to invest in biologicals will certainly enhance market acceptance and market penetration, especially in fruits and vegetables, but also in row crops, for example in the U.S. and Brazil,” said Utz Klages, Bayer CropScience spokesman.

Tirosh added, “There’s no doubt that the continued adoption of biopesticides by multinationals means that penetration into mainstream spray programs will continue at a rapid pace and clearly this will add to the exploration of value into row crops.”

None of this is to say that incorporating biopesticides is an automatic easy transition for traditional crop protection companies – far from it.

Challenges include biopesticides’ more demanding manufacturing and logistics, and the need to learn how to evaluate, develop and market the products, according to Dr. Mark Trimmer of the consultancy DunhamTrimmer. Training field staff is key. “Traditional crop protection companies will need to adjust their sales and marketing approaches to succeed with biologicals,” Trimmer said in an interview.

“Biopesticide benefits, such as residue and resistance management, are optimized when used in programs in combination with conventional chemistry,” he said. “Those companies that integrate biologicals into their thinking and train their field sales teams to promote them effectively will have an advantage.”

Big Growth and the ‘Wal-Mart Factor’

Bill Stoneman, executive director of the Biopesticides Industry Alliance, pointed out that it would seem that few biological companies would be left to acquire, but instead, he said more have sprouted up in the wake of the buying spree. Companies are also increasingly reaching out to seed treatment players to bulk up their portfolios and boost biopesticide consumption, such as Syngenta’s Clariva biological seed treatment nematicide based on technology it acquired from Pasteuria Bioscience in 2012.

Another recent example: In March, Bayer acquired Biagro Group, an Argentinian producer and distributor of biological seed treatment solutions especially in soybeans. Bayer is set to further expand its seed treatment business, known as SeedGrowth, by offering “an attractive and high-quality on-seed portfolio based on products, coatings, equipment and services,” said Matthias Haug, head of Bayer SeedGrowth.

Biopesticides still represent only about 3.5% or $1.93 billion of the $53 billion global crop protection market, according to DunhamTrimmer. That is up from $1 billion five years ago and $500 million a decade ago. The industry is highly fragmented, with more than 200 companies operating globally and the top 20 of those accounting for two-thirds of the market. Compare that with traditional crop protection market, in which the Big 6 eat up more than 72% of total sales.

Pam Marrone, founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations

The biopesticide industry rose more than 15% last year, and the trend is expected to continue. Pamela Marrone, founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations, said her company outpaced that growth with more than doubling of sales. “The growth drivers of using biologicals for residue and resistance management and where chemicals are restricted or not allowed, will continue,” she said. Further, she noted that biologicals can be used right up to harvest to manage residues, are produced using agricultural raw materials and aid in reducing water use in crop production. There is also the Wal-Mart factor: They can help large food companies and retailers meet their sustainability goals, and help meet consumers’ requirements for health and wellness.

The launches move along at a fast clip. Marrone is rolling out one to new products per year and expanding its existing products, including Grandevo bioinsecticide and Regalia biofungicide, which snapped up five new registrations in Latin America last year and ran a successful test launch for plant health in corn and soybeans last year. “We are expanding its acreage in 2014 and moving into canola, wheat and rice. We also found that Regalia’s mode of action for resistance management and bee safety gave it a boost in California almonds,” she said.

Following this spring’s debut of Venerate bioinsecticide, Marrone is also set to launch Haven, a product that reduces transpiration, resulting in crop yield increase. In less than a year, the company built a fermentation manufacturing plant for making Grandevo, and in June, it closed on $40 million follow-on stock offering. “These new funds allow us to accelerate moving our active ingredients into seed treatments, further international expansion and to expand the pipeline,” Marrone said.

Stockton Group’s Tirosh summed up the industry’s generally optimistic outlook: “We are still in the very initial era of penetration of biopesticides and their full adoption into spray programs … We have enough value already to make this into a solid shift.”

"PicoAg 4n1 25B" is a pico-biopesticide and Bacteria, Insects, Fungi, and Virus are controlled!

"PicoAg 4n1 25B" is a biopesticide and Bacteria, Insects, Fungi, and Virus are controlled!

We don't see these buys as Pico competition for last 20 years, The biologicals buying spree by agchem companies large and small swept the industry almost as fast as the spread of weed resistance. Bayer’s trendsetting purchase of AgraQuest for nearly $500 million to BASF’s $1.02 billion acquisition of Becker Underwood to Monsanto’s $300 million investment in Novozymes in their so-called BioAg Alliance

As a biopesticide you need a multipurpose mode of action for each elimination of vital elements in Bacteria, Insects, Fungi, and Virus pests you want to control.

Bacteria: elimination of cell membrane and to puncture it and drain proteins and lipid, PH.
Fungi: elimination of the cellulose and chitin.
Viruses: elimination of strands of nucleic acid, either DNA or RNA, and protective protein coat (the capsid), Or a lipid envelope, surrounding the protein.
Insects: elimination or penetration and dissolve lipid cellular membranes, cells desiccation, cellular metabolism, dissolving cuticles, lubrication joints leading to paralysis, stripping the pests protective shields, exoskeleton structure, chitin and protein substances, hydrocarbon chains smothering.

"PicoAg 4n1 25B" immediately impacts the exoskeleton structure of the pest upon contact by disrupting the molecular structure of the chitin and other protein substances that protect the insect. This mechanism of action triggers the rapid and irreversible deterioration of the insect's spiracles and tracheal system, resulting in suffocation. "PicoAg 4n1 25B" kills insects with elimination of chitin is a polysaccharide, a carbohydrate that has a chain sugar molecules, Chitin is a structure like cellulose. In addition to being found in exoskeletons.

"PicoAg 4n1 25B" major benefit of this revolutionary method of insect control is the absence of undesirable side effects on human health and no harm to the ecosystem. Additionally, unlike standard insecticides in use today, no built-in resistance can be developed by the targeted insects, but rather on the respiratory apparatus."

Science suggests that "PicoAg 4n1 25B" can be mechanical in primary sequential steps:

The first step is a direct interaction between the surface and the pests outer membrane, causing the membrane to rupture and leak fluids, proteins and nutrients.

  • There can be a second step related to the holes in the outer membrane, through which the pests lose vital nutrients, protein, water and components, causing a general weakening of the pests.

  • Lastly a few more ways "PicoAg 4n1 25B" electromechanical can affect pests

  • Electromechanical in can affect pests by penetration and dissolve lipid cellular membranes.

  • This causes cells desiccation to leak water, proteins and nutrients and collapse,

  • By interfering with cellular metabolism during metamorphosis,

  • By dissolving cuticles the lubrication in the insect’s joints leading to paralysis

  • By stripping the pests protective shields (wax, biofilm, etc), rendering it defenseless against subsequent treatment

  • The extracts impact the exoskeleton structure of pests upon contact by disrupting the molecular structure of the chitin and other protein substances that protect the insect,

  • The extracts have the ability to penetrate complex hydrocarbon chains and disintegrate them,

  • The extracts emulsify pests thus stopping their reproduction cycle.

  • The change the environment for growth with PH from acidophiles and neutrophiles to alkaliphiles .

    After punching holes, how does "PicoAg 4n1 25B" further damage the cell? Now that the cells main defense has been breached, there is an unopposed stream of "PicoAg 4n1 25B" entering the pest cell. This puts several vital processes inside the cell in danger. "PicoAg 4n1 25B" literally overwhelms the inside of the cell and obstructs cell metabolism (i.e., the biochemical reactions needed for life). These reactions are accomplished. When "PicoAg 4n1 25B" binds to these enzymes, their activity grinds to a halt. Pests can no longer "breathe", "eat", "digest", “reproduce” or “exist”.

    How can "PicoAg 4n1 25B" punch holes in a pests? Every cell's outer membrane, including that of a single cell organism like a pests, is characterized by a stable electrical micro-current. This is often called "transmembrane potential", and is literally, a voltage difference between the inside and the outside of a cell. It is strongly suspected that when a pests comes in contact with a "PicoAg 4n1 25B" surface, a short circuiting of the current in the cell membrane can occur. This weakens the membrane and creates holes and leak water, proteins and nutrients.

    How can "PicoAg 4n1 25B" effect be so fast, and affect such a wide range of pests? The experiences observed explain the speed with which pests and other pests perish on "PicoAg 4n1 25B" surfaces by the multi-targeted effects. After membrane perforation, can inhibit any given enzyme that "stands in its way," and stop the cell from transporting or digesting nutrients, from repairing its damaged membrane, from breathing or multiplying. Harmless to Environment Air, Water, Soil, Humans, Birds and Animals. This 80 year old science has no side effects or harm on human, birds and animal health. These solutions do not harm mammal cells nor do they attack neurological systems of humans, birds and animals.

    How Does "PicoAg 4n1 25B" Puncture And Leak From Membranes? It is used on lyse cells to extract protein or organelles, or to permeabilize the membranes of living cells.

    What is permeabilization of cells? The organic product dissolve lipids from cell membranes making them permeable to antibodies. Because the organic solvents also coagulate proteins, they can be used to fix and permeabilize cells at the same time. Saponin interacts with membrane cholesterol, selectively removing it and leaving holes in the membrane. Permeabilization is a the process of making something, such as a membrane or cell wall, permeable. Lyse is a verb referring to the process of lysis, the death of a cell. Lysis (/'la?s?s/ LY-sis; Greek ??s?? lýsis, "a loosing" from ??e?? lýein, "to unbind") refers to the breaking down of the membrane of a cell, often by viral, enzymic, or osmotic (that is, "lytic" /'l?t?k/ LIT-?k) mechanisms that compromise its integrity. A fluid containing the contents of lysed cells is called a lysate. In molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology laboratories, cell cultures may be subjected to lysis in the process of purifying their components, as in protein purification, DNA extraction, RNA extraction, or in purifying organelles.

    Trophobiosis Cycle: Pests shun healthy plants. Pesticides weaken plants. Weakened plants open the door to pests and disease. Hence pesticides precipitate pest attack and disease susceptibility, and thus they induce a cycle of further pesticide use. Unlike previous Biorationals, "PicoAg controls Bacteria, Fungi, Virus and Small Insects, so visit
    www.picocides.com !

    Picotechnology is a Game Changer for today's Agriculture Product “PicoAG 4-N-1" made of only atoms 1000 times smaller than nano and made of femtotechnology (Electrons, Protons, Neutrons) elements! PicoAg will replace Ag Pesticides, Ag Fertilizer, Ag Remediation, and Ag Production with No Side Effects with a single product of atoms 100% organic matter. So this begs the question why, isn't Picotechnology taught in any worldwide university?, Because there would be no Agri-Chem! Two universities say a technology change would cause millions of unemployed throughout agriculture industry! Don't forget the moisture in “PicoAG 4-N-1" can kill acidophiles, neutrophiles, The Purge has Started!!

    "PicoAG 4-N-1" product is made of Femtotechnology (Electrons, Protons, Neutrons)
    elements! In Just 2 oz you get this!

    In one inch you have 74,708,882 Atoms
    In one square inch of you have 5,580,968,805,397,920 Atoms
    In one cubic inch or 2 oz you have 416,931,197,021,738,000,000,000 Atoms


Total Atoms Per Acre

Atoms Per Foot

Total Atoms

416,931,197,021,738,000,000,000

12,063,981,395,304,900,000

The Carbon(C)

376,071,939,713,608,000,000,000

10,881,711,218,565,000,000

Nitrogen (N)

33,354,495,761,739,100,000,000

965,118,511,624,394,000

Phosphorus (P)

667,089,915,234,781,000,000

19,302,370,232,487,900

Potassium (K)

958,941,753,149,998,000,000

27,747,157,209,201,300

Calcium (Ca)

875,555,513,745,650,000,000

25,334,360,930,140,300

Magnesium (Mg)

667,089,915,234,781,000,000

19,302,370,232,487,900

Sulfur (Su)

625,396,795,532,607,000,000

18,095,972,092,957,400

Zinc (Zn)

25,015,871,821,304,300,000

723,838,883,718,296

Manganese (Mn)

50,031,743,642,608,600,000

1,447,677,767,436,590

Aluminum (Al)

488,893,521,627,690,000,000

14,146,224,584,134,600

Silicon (SI)

300,857,551,770,886,000,000

8,705,368,974,852,040


Pico Ag Med Cleaning Inc. 805 Cottage Hill Way, Brandon, Fl 33511 USA 800-995-9203, Intl 336-306-0193
Email or Call: donwilshe@biobased.us


























Biopesticide Active Ingredients

You may need a PDF reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA’s About PDF page to learn more. The following is a list of all biopesticide active ingredients (biochemical and microbial) that have been registered by EPA as of July 25, 2018. Also available: List of Current and Previously Registered Section 3 Plant-Incorporated-Protectant Registrations. The list is comprehensive and does not consider the regulatory status of the active ingredients.Appearance on this list does not confirm that this is still a currently registered active ingredient with the Agency. Sort the table by ingredient, PC code, or year registered. For information on the active ingredient status, approved use sites, and product labels for a particular active ingredient, visit the Pesticide Product and Label System webpage. Use the Pesticide Chemical Search webpage to find additional information on these active ingredients, including links to regulatory decision documents.



Active Ingredient Name PC Code DATE

3S, 6S)-3-Methyl-6-isopropenyl-9-decen-1-yl acetate

017704

2004

(3S,6R)-3-Methyl-6-isopropenyl-9-decen-1-yl acetate

017703

2004

(E)-(3,3- Dimethylcyclohexylidene) acetaldehyde

112403

1992

(E)-11-Tetradecen-1-yl acetate

129019

1997

(E)-4-Tridecen-l-yl acetate

121902

1982

(E)-5-Decen-1-ol

078038

1995

(E)-5-Decen-1-yl acetate

117703

1995

(E)-8-Dodecen-1-yl acetate

128907

1990

(E)-9-Dodecen-1-yl acetate

119004

1999

(E)-9-dodecenyl acetate

117702

1993

(E,E)-1-(1-oxo-2,4-decadienyl) pyrrolidine

373501

2013

(E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol

129028

1992

(E,Z) - 3,13 - Octadecadienol

129117

2006

(E,Z)-2,13-Octadecadien-1-ol

117244

2011

(E,Z)-2,13-Octadecadien-1-yl Acetate

117242

2011

(E,Z)-3,13-Octadecadien-1- yl acetate

117202

1995

(E,Z)-7,9-Dodecadien-1-ol acetate

011471

2010

(E,Z,Z)-3,8,11-Tetradecatrien-1-ol acetate

011472

2010

(R)-(-)-1-Octen-3-ol

069038

2007

(R,Z)-5-(1-Decenyl) dihydro-2(3H)-furanone

116501

1983

(S)-Hydroprene

128966

1988

(Z)-(3,3- Dimethylcyclohexylidene) acetaldehyde

112404

1992

(Z)-11-Hexadecen-1-yl Acetate

129071

1991

(Z)-11-Tetradecen-1-yl acetate

128980

1988

(Z)-2-(3,3- Dimethylcyclohexylidene) ethanol

112402

1992

(Z)-4-Tridecen-1-yl acetate

121901

1982

(Z)-6-Heneicosen-l 1-one

129060

2005

(Z)-7, 8-epoxy-2-methyloctadecane

114301

1992

(Z)-8-Dodecen-1-ol

128908

1990

(Z)-8-Dodecen-1-yl acetate

128906

1990

(Z, E)-7, 11-Hexadecadien-1-yl Acetate

114101

1978

(Z, Z)-7, 11-Hexadecadien-1-yl Acetate

114102

1978

(Z,E)-9,12-Tetradecadien-1-yl acetate

117203

2006

(Z,Z) - 3,13 - Octadecadienol

117241

2006

(Z,Z)-11,13-Hexadecadienal

000711

2000

(Z,Z)-3,13-Octadecadien-1- yl acetate

117201

1995

(Z,Z)-7,11-Hexadecadienal

000712

2013

(Z,Z,E)-7,11,13-Hexadecatrienal

029000

2010

1,2,4-Trimethoxybenzene

040515

1994

1,2-Octanediol

168602

2016

1,4-Dimethylnapththalene

055802

1995

1,7 -dioxaspiro-(5,5)-undecane (Spiroketal)

124851

2003

1-Indole-3-butanethioic acid, S-phenyl ester

128958

1993

1-Methylcyclopropene

224459

1999

1-Octen-3-ol

069037

1996

1-Triacontanol

116201

1991

2,6-Dlisopropylnaphthalene

055803

2003

2-Cyclopenten-1-one, 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-

004049

1998

2-Methyl-1-butanol

431602

2010

2-Phenethyl Propionate

102601

1983

3-[N-butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid, ethyl ester (IR3535)

113509

1999

3-Decen-2-one

068403

2013

3-Ketopetromyzonol-24-sulfate, ammonium salt

000803

2015

3-Methyl-2-cyclohexen-1- one

219700

1999

4-(p-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone, acetate (Cue-Lure)

128916

2005

4-allyl anisole (Estragole)

062150

2001

6-benzyladenine [N-(phenylmethyl)-1 H·purine-6-amine]

116901

1985

7,11-Hexadecadien-1-ol, acetate,(Z,E)-

128914

1995

9,10-Anthraquinone

122701

1998

9,11-Tetradecadien-l-ol 1-Acetate, (E9,E11)

128000

2008

9-Dodecen-1 -yl acetate

129004

1990

A blend of CrylA(c) and CrylC derived delta endotoxins of thuringiensis encapsulated in killed pseudomonas fluorescens (*Patent Pending)

006457

1995

Absciscic acid

272000

2010

Acetic Acid

044001

1997

Agrobacterium radiobacter (strain K1026)

006474

1999

Agrobacterium radiobacter (strain K84)

114201

1979

Alternaria destruens Strain 059

028301

2005

Ammonium bicarbonate

073401

2004

Ammonium nonanoate

031802

2006

Ampelomyces quisquails isolate M-1 0

021007

1994

Aspergillus flavus strain AF36

006456

2003

Asvereillus flavusem NRRL 21882

006500

2004

Aureobasidium pullulans strain DSM 14940,Aureobasidium pullulans strain DSM 14941

046010 036010

2012

Azadirachtin

121701

1989

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MBI 600 (antecedent Bacillus subtilis MBI 600)

129082

1998

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain D747

016482

2011

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain F727

016489

2017

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain MBI 600

129082

1998

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain PTA-4838

016488

2016

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, ATCC # 23842 706480 2001

006402

1971

Bacillus firmus (strain 1-1582)

029072

2008

Bacillus licheniformis SB3086

006492

2003

Bacillus licheniformis strain FMCH001

006592

2018

Bacillus mycoides isolate J

006516

2016

Bacillus Pumilus strain GB34

006493

2001

Bacillus pumilus strain QST 2808

006485

2004

Bacillus sphaericus 2362, serotype H5a5b, strain ABTS 1743

119803

2000

Bacillus subtilis GB03

129068

1992

Bacillus subtilis strain BU1814

006071

2017

Bacillus subtilis strain CX-9060

016480

2011

Bacillus subtilis strain FMCH002

006593

2018

Bacillus subtilis strain IAB/BS03

006544

2015

Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens Strain FZB24

006480

2000

Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. kurstaki strain EVB-113-19

006700

2016

Bacillus thuringiensis sub. kurstaki strain EG7673 Lepidopteran active toxin

006447

1995

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Aizawai

006403

1991

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain ABTS-1857

006523

1991

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain GC-91

006426

1992

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain NB200

006494

2005

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae strain SDS-502; fermentation solids, spores insecticidal toxins

006399

2013

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Israelensis

006401

1982

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain ABTS-351

006522

1971

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain BMP 123

006407

1993

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain EG2348

006424

1994

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain EG7841 Lepidopteran active toxin

006453

2002

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, strain VBTS-2546

006699

2012

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Kustaki strain EG2371

006423

1995

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis strain NB-176

006524

1988

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis strain NB-176

006524

1988

Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis Strain BMP 144

006520

1982

Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki strain SA-12

006518

1971

Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies tenebrionis strain SA-10

006605

2016

Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki strain M-200 protein toxin

006452

1996

Bacillus thuringiensis, subsp. israelensis, strain AM 65-52

069162

1982

Bacillus thuringiensis, subsp. israelensis, strain EG2215,

006476

1998

Bacillus thuringiensis, subsp. israelensis, strain SA3 A

069210

1982

Bacillus thuringiensis, subspecies kurstaki strain SA-11

006519

1971

Bacillus thuringiensissubsp. israelensis, Strain SUM-6218

006642

2016

Bacillus thuringiensissubspecies kurstaki, strain EG7826

006459

1996

Bacteriophage active against Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato

006521

2005

Bacteriophage active against zanthomonas campestris pv. Vesicatoria

006449

2005

Balsam Fir Oil

129035

2007

Banda de Lupinus albus doce (BLAD)

030006

2013

Beauveria bassiana ATCC 74040

128818

1995

Beauveria bassiana GHA

128924

1995

Beauveria bassiana HF23

090305

2006

Beauveria bassiana strain 447

128815

2002

Beauveria bassiana strain ANT-03

129990

2014

Burkholderia (pseudomonas) cepacia type Wisconsin isolate/strain J82

006464

1996

Butyl Mercaptan

125001

1999

Calcium acetate

011470

2010

Calcium Disodium Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid (EDTA) Dihydrate

011528

2018

Calcium lactate

000298

2008

Calcium Salts of Phosphorous Acid

120090

2018

Candida oleophilaisolate I-182

021008

1995

Candida oleophilaStrain 0

021010

2009

Canola oil

011332

1998

Capsaicin

070701

1964

Castor oil

031608

1994

Cedarwood oil

040505

1998

Chenopodium ambrosioides var. ambrosioides

599995

2008

Chitin

128991

1988

Chitosan

128930

1986

Choline chloride

018102

2015

Chondrostereum purptireum isolate PFC 2139

081308

2004

Chondrostereum purpureum strain HQ1

081309

2005

Chromobacterium subtsugae strain PRAA4-1T

016329

2011

Cinnamaldehyde

040506

1994

Citral

040510

2011

Citronella oil

021901

1965

Citronellol (3,7 -Dimethyl-6-octen-I-ol)

167004

2004

Clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil

025007

1996

Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp aeschynomene and fermentation medium

226300

2006

Complex Polymeric Polyhyroxy Acids

078503

2013

Coniothyrium minitans strain CON/M/91-08

028836

2001

Copper 2-ethylhexanoate (hexanoic acid)

041201

2016

Corn Gluten Meal

100137

2002

Cottonseed oil

031602

1982

Coyote Urine

029007

2006

Cyclobutaneethanol, 1-methyl-2-(1-methylethenyl)-

112401

1992

Cyclopentaneacetic acid, 3-oxo-2-(2-pentenyl)-, methyl ester (methyl jasmonate)

028100

2013

Cydiapomonella granulovirus

129090

2000

Cytokinin, as Kinetin

116801

1978

Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensisvariety kurstaki encapsulated in killed Pseudomonas fluorescens

006409

1995

Diallyl sulfides

129087

2003

Dihydroazadirachtin

121702

1996

Dipotassum phosphate

176407

2002

Dodecanol (Lauryl alcohol)

001509

1992

Douglas fir tussock moth nucleopolyhedrovirus

107302

1998

Dried blood

000611

1995

Dried fermentation solids and solubles of Myrothecium verrucaria

119204

2000

Dried fermentation solids and solubles resulting from fermentation of Trichoderma harzianum isolate T-39, containing T-39 fungus propagules, as either conidia or mycelia

119200

1996

Duddingtonia flagrans strain IAH 1297

033000

2018

E-11-Tetradecenyl

129020

1994

E-9-Tricosene

103202

1989

Ethyl (2E,4Z)-2-4-Decadienoate

144022

2013

Ethylene

041901

1971

Eucalyptus oil

040503

1994

Eugenol

102701

1983

Extract of Chenopodium quinoa saponins (containing approximately equimolar amounts of triterpene bidesmosidic glycosides of oleanolic acid, hederagenin, and phytolaccagenic acid)

097094

2005

Extract of Reynoutria sachalinensis

055809

2000

Extract of Swinglea glutinosa

097096

2018

Farnesol

128910

1987

Fish oil

122401

1998

Formic Acid (including formates)

214900

1999

Fox Urine

029008

2007

Furfuryl propionate

116888

2015

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)

030802

1997

Garlic oil

128827

1980

Geraniol

597501

1972

German cockroach pheromone

029028

2001

Gibberellic acid

043801

1962

Gibberellic acid, monopotassium salt

043802

1989

Gibberellin A4 mixed with Gibberellin A7

116902

1969

Gliocladium catenulatum Strain J1446

021009

1998

Gliocladium virens GL-21

129000

1996

Glycerol monocaprate

011291

2003

Glycerol monocaprylate

011292

2003

Glycerol monolaurate

011290

2003

GS-omega/kappa-Hxtx-Hv1a (spider venom peptides)

006100

2014


Harpin Protein

006477

2000

Harpin αβ Protein (Harpin Alpha Beta Protein)

006506

2005

Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus strain BV-0003

129078

2015

Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus strain BV-0003

129078

2015

Helicoverpa zea ABA Nucleopolyhedrovirus-U

107200

2014

Heptyl Butyrate

100247

2008

Homobrassinolide

067700

2010

Humates (as derived from Leonardite)

021818

2014

Hydrogenated castor oil

031604

1988

Hydroprene

486300

1991

Indian Meal Moth Granulosis Virus

108896

2001

Indole

025000

1994

Indole Acetic Acid (IAA)

128915

2007

Indole-3-butyric acid

046701

1964

Iron HEDTA (FeHEDTA)

034702

2008

Iron Phosphate

034903

1997

Isaria fumosorosea Apopka Strain 97 (formerly Paecilomyces fumosoroseus

115002

1998

Isaria fumosorosea strain FE 9901

115003

2011

Isomers of 4-(or 5-)Chloro-2methylcyclohexane-carboxylic acid, 1,1-dimethyl ester

112603

2001

Isopropyl myristate

000207

2011

Jojoba oil

067200

1996

Kaolin

100104

1998

Killed, non-viable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110

016328

2012

Kinetin

116802

1995

Kinoprene

107501

1995

L-Carvone

079500

2009

L-Glutamic acid

374350

1998

L-Lactic Acid

128929

1988

Lagenidium giganteum, mycelium or oospores

12908

1996

Laminarin

123200

2010

Lavandin oil

040500

1996

Lavandulyl senecloate

036005

2010

LCO SP104

006388

2018

Lemongrass oil

040502

1972

Lindalool

128838

1985

Linseed oil

031603

1986

Live Chlamydospores of Phytophthora palmivora

111301

1981

lonone Alpha

129030

1972

Lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE)

105120

2002

Meat meal

100628

1996

Menthol

051601

1989

Metarhizium anisopliae Strain 52

029056

2003

Metarhizium anisopliae Strain ESF1

129056

1993

Methoprene

105401

1981

Methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside

110006

2018

Methyl Anthranilate (MA), methyl 2-aminobenzoate

128725

1994

Methyl nonyl ketone

044102

1966

Methyl salicylate and Oil of Wintergreen

076601

1972

Methyleugenol

203900

2006

Mint oil

128800

2000

Mono- and di-potassium salts of Phosphorous Acid

076416

1997

MUSCODOR ALBUS QST 20799

006503

2005

Muscodor albus strain SA-13

006666

2016

Myristyl alcohol (tetradecan-1-ol)

001510

1992

n-tetradecyl acetate

128002

2008

Natamycin

051102

2012

Neem Oil

025006

2009

Nerolidol

128911

1987

Nitrogen, Liquid

128934

1987

Nonanoic acid

217500

1992

Nosema locustae

117001

1982

Occlusion bodies (OB) of the gypsy moth nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV)

107303

1978

Oil of Bergamot

129029

1972

Oil of black pepper

000669

2004

Oil of geranium

597500

1989

Oil of Mustard and Allyl Isothiocyanate

004901

1972

Oil of orange

040517

1972

Oil of thyme

597800

2004

Oregano Oil (Organum Vulgar)

004300

2011

Oriental mustard seed (Brassica juncea)

014921

2008

Oxypurinol

447509

1999

p-Menthane-3,8-diol

011550

2000

Paecilomyces lilacinus strain 25 1

028826

2005

Pantoea agglomerans

006470

2006

Pantoea agglomerans strain E325; NRRL B-21856

006511

2006

Papaya Ringspot Virus Resistance Gene (Papaya Ringspot Virus Coat Protein Gene) in X17-2 Papaya

006701

2016

Pasteuna spp (Rotylenchulusremformisnematode)-Pr3

016456

2012

Pasteuria nishizawae – Pn1

016455

2012

Pasteuria usgae - Bll

006545

2009

Penta-Termanone

400005

2011

Phlebiopsis gigantea strain VRA 1992

006111

2016

Phosphorous acid

076002

2000

Piperidine

043501

2004

Plant extract derived from Quercus falcata, Opuntia lindheimeri, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle tissues

169007

1997

Polyhedral occlusion bodies (Obs) of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus

127885

2002

Polyhedral occlusion bodies (OBs) of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm)

107300

1992

Polyoxin D zinc salt

230000

1997

Potassium bicarbonate

073508

1994

Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate

076413

1998

Potassium Silicate

072606

2006

propyl-3-oxo-2-pentylcyclo-pentylacetate

028000

2013

Propylene glycol monocaprate

011289

2003

Propylene glycol monocaprylate

082074

2003

Propylene glycol monolaurate

011288

2003

Pseudomonas aureofadens strain Tx-l

006473

1999

Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 63-28

006478

2001

Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain AFS009

006800

2017

Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS

006439

1992

Pseudomonas fluorescens A506

006438

1992

Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain D7

016418

2014


Pseudomonas syringae 742RS

006411

1992

Pseudomonas syringae, strain ESC-10

006441

1994

Pseudomonas syringae, strain ESC-11

006451

1996

Pseudozyma flocculosa strain PF-A22 UL

119196

2002

Puccinia thlaspeos strain woad (dyer's woad rust)

006489

2002

pumilus strain BU F-33

007493

2013

Putrescent Whole Egg Solids

105101

1975

Pythium oligandrum DV 74

028816

2007

QST 713 strain of Bacillus subtilis

006479

2000

Red pepper

070703

1996

Refined Oil of Nepeta cataria

004801

2008

Rhamnolipid Biosurfactant

110029

2004

S-Kinoprene

107502

1997

s-Methoprene

105402

1975

S]-trans-2-Amino-4-(2-aminoethoxy)-3-butenoic acid hydrochloride

129104

1997

Salicylic Acid

076602

2012

Saponins of Quillaja saponaria

097095

2007

Sesame oil

072401

1988

Sesame plant, ground

128970

1988

Silver nitrate

072503

2001

Sodium 5-Nitroguaiacolate

129075

1995

Sodium bicarbonate

073505

1994

Sodium Carbonate Peroxhydrate

128860

2002

Sodium Ferric EDTA

139114

2008

Sodium Nonanoyloxybenzenesulfonate

089053

1998

Sodium o-Nitrophenolate

129076

1992

Sodium p-Nitrophenolate

129077

1995

Sodium silver thiosulfate

080119

2003

Sorbitol octanoate

035400

2006

Soybean oil

031605

2000

Spodoptera exigua multinucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) strain BV-0004

129345

2015

Spodoptera frugiperda MNPV-3AP2

129346

2016

Spores of and Bacillus lentimorbus

054501

1987

Spores of Bacillus popilliae

054502

1995

Streptomyces lydicus strain WYEC 108

006327

2004

Streptomyces strain K61

129069

1993

Sucrose

000023

2007

Sucrose octanoate

035300

2002

Tagetes oil

176602

2012

Tea tree oil

028853

2014

thuringiensis subsp. Tenebrionis

006405

1988

Thyme Herbs

128894

2000

Trichoderma asperellum (ICC 012)

119208

2010

Trichoderma gamsii(ICC 080)

119207

2010

Trichoderma hamatumisolate 382

119205

2010

Trichoderma harzianum Rifai (variety); KRL-AG2

119202

1993

Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22

119202

2000

Trichoderma polysporum (ATCC 20475)

128902

1989

Trichoderma virens strain G-4 and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain 1-22

1776604

2012

Trichoderma viride (ATCC 20476) 128903 1989

128903

1989

Trimethylamine (generated from trimethylamine HCL 1.00%)

221801

2009

Trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF)

105403

2004

Ulocladium oudemansii (U3 Strain)

102111

2009

Verbenone (4,6,6-trimethyl-bicyclo (3.1.1) hept-3-en-2-one)

128986

1991

Verticillium isolate WCS850

081305

2005

Xanthine

116900

1999

Yeast

100054

2009

Yeast extract hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

100053

2004

Z-11-Tetradecen-1-ol

129021

2007

Z-11-Tetradecenal

120011

2007

Z-9-Tetradecen-1-ol

119409

1999

Z-9-Tetradecen-1-yl Acetate

129109

2007

Z-9-Tricosene

103201

1975

Z-Tetradec-7-en-2-one

127600

2009

Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus - Weak Strain

244201

2007

Z}-7·(Z, E)-11.He.xadecadlen·1-ol Acelate (Glossyplure)

114103

1986